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Persian Pottery and Ceramic

Persian Pottery Handicraft
Persian Pottery
Persian Pottery Handicraft | Kubachi Pottery
Kubachi Pottery
Iranian Pottery Handicraft | Ancient Persian Pottery
Ancient Persian Pottery
Iranian Pottery Handicraft | Lusterware Vase
Lusterware Vase
Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Nuts Bowls Code80-2-2

Mina&Pottery Design

Persian Pottery Nuts Bowls
Code 80-2-2 Persian Blue Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Nuts Bowls Code80-2-0

Mina&Pottery Design

Persian Pottery Nuts Bowls
Code 80-2-0 Persian Blue Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Candle Holder Code83-2-0

Mina&Pottery Design

Persian Pottery Candle Holder
Code 83-2-0 Persian Blue Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Vase Code454-2-0

Tazhib Design

Persian Pottery Vase
Code 454-2-0 Persian Blue Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Lights Code90-2-0

Mina&Pottery Design

Persian Pottery Lights
Code 90-2-0 Persian Blue Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Vase Code462-12-3

Aranik Design

Persian Pottery Vase
Code 462-12-3 Persian Orange Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Tea-Pot Code405-11-0

Flower Design

Persian Pottery Tea-Pot
Code 405-11-0 Persian Brown Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Wall Clock Code76-5-0

Mina&Pottery Design

Persian Pottery Wall Clock
Code 76-5-0 Persian Green Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Sugar Bowl Code428-5-0

Flower Design

Persian Pottery Sugar Bowl
Code 428-5-0 Persian Green Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Plate Code416-4-0

Friends Design

Persian Pottery Plate
Code 416-4-0 Persian Yellow Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Sweet-Dish Code117-5-0

Mina&Pottery Design

Persian Pottery Sweet-Dish
Code 117-5-0 Persian Green Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Vase Code68-4-0

Mina&Pottery Design

Persian Pottery Vase
Code 68-4-0 Persian Yellow Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Pedestal Dish Code78-2-0

Mina&Pottery Design

Persian Pottery Pedestal Dish
Code 78-2-0 Persian Blue Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Vase Code460-11-2

Silk Design

Persian Pottery Vase
Code 460-11-2 Persian Brown Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Tea-Pot Code404-11-0

Simple Design

Persian Pottery Tea-Pot
Code 404-11-0 Persian Brown Pottery

Meybod Lalejin Kalporgan Pottery | Persian Pottery Glass Code88-2-6

Mina&Pottery Design

Persian Pottery Glass
Code 88-2-6 Persian Blue Pottery

Persian Pottery History

Pottery is considered as such a kind of oldest man-made pieces that has been used throughout its life from the earliest times ever. The construction of the pottery over time has changed dramatically in terms of gender, form, color, and role as the prehistoric cultures have changed and the experience of the human race has changed. The art of pottery and ceramic has a long history in Iran. Persian pottery history dates back to Sassanid era and continued in Islamic era. The use of glaze and enamel working on pottery became popular in Saljughian dynasty. Today, Meybod in Yazd province, Lalejin in Hamedan province and Kalporgan (The World Village for 7000 Years-Old Pottery) in Baluchestan province are the pottery cities in Iran.

Persian Pottery Marks

The early patterns depicted on potteries were simple angular ones. Later, animals and plants were painted on ceramics in stylized ways. Potteries, in general, were made in the buff, red and gray colors. The patterns on them were quite often in red or black. Decorating potteries by painting various patterns are indicative of ancient Iranians’ tastes for expressing their feelings, needs, appreciations and wishnesses. Paintings on pottery are abstract symbols that remained from generation to generation and indicate the artist’s beliefs and spiritual desires of her surroundings. In Iranian pottery history Seljuks era is important. During that time animals’ patterns and calligraphic writings were used to decorate pottery objects.

The First Iranian Potters

Probably the first potters were women. They must have made various kitchen objects like vessels and containers for the storage or distribution of foodstuff as well as decorative or ritual objects like figurines for the sake of decoration or ceremonies. Such of these Iranian handicraft objects have been found in various parts of Iran belonging to the same or different periods. Each period has its peculiarities in pottery making. Forms, styles and techniques have undergone evolutionary stages so that wonderful works of art can be created. For example teapot-like vessels were in the form of teapot with spout beautifully stylized. Some of them have a small handle to take the vessel by one finger. In some cases, the spout looked like birds’ bills.

Kashan Pottery

The two major decorative techniques found on the ceramics of medieval Kashan are luster painting and the polychrome enamel decoration termed minakari. These two techniques both involve fixing overglaze painting onto previously glazed and fired stonepaste bodies through a secondary firing at a lower temperature. They were at times practiced by the same painters, even appearing on the same vessels.

Kubachi Pottery

A group of blue-and-white wares belonging to the 15th and early 16th century are known as Kubachi wares because large numbers of them survived above ground in this town in the Caucasus. They have a very soft body, a brilliant crackled glaze, and rhythmical and spontaneous designs. The later Kubachi blue-and-white is closer to the Chinese originals.

Kerman Pottery

Its wares are characterized by a very strong bright blue and a wavy, rather bubbly, glaze. Pseudo-Chinese marks were frequently added to the blue and white. The most usual colours on Kerman polychrome wares are blue, green, browns, and a bright red similar to Armenian bole. The quality of production declined considerably during the 18th century.

Nishapur Pottery

Nishapur pottery were of bold style and showed links with Sāssānian and Central Asian work. The style originated in Transoxania, an ancient district of Iran, during the 9th century ad and showed such specific characteristics as black and ochre birds with dashes of white and green. A rougher type portraying human and animal figures against an ornamental background also existed.

Islamic Pottery

There is little pottery of merit from the period of the Umayyad caliphate. At this time the attempts were made to synthesize the formal repetitive style derived from the ancient Babylonian and Assyrian civilizations with naturalistic ornament in the Greco-Roman style. In Abbāsids era, the European influence on ornament waned. Good use continued to be made of Western techniques.

Ceramic Types

Ceramics include all objects made from clay which are shaped when wet and hardened by heating. Fired clay has been used to create both functional and decorative objects since prehistoric times. In general, the higher the firing temperatures, the more durable and less porous the ceramic can be. Ceramics can be divided into three main categories: Earthenware, Porcelain and Stoneware.

Earthenware

Earthenware is fired at low temperatures and ranges in colour from white to brown. Earthenware is prone to staining and their pieces tend to have thicker walls than stoneware and porcelain.

Stoneware

Stoneware is fired at a high temperature and varies in colour from light grey to dark red, depending on the clay. It has a strong, non-porous body. Stoneware can be unglazed or glazed.

Porcelain

Porcelain are ceramics with a white body fired at a high temperature. hard-paste porcelain which has a glassy appearance, soft-paste porcelain and bone-china are 3 types of porcelains.

Persian Ceramics

Persian Ceramics is made by mixing Feldspar, clay and sand. It is heated at high temperature. It is glazed and polished before being heated. This is due to the fact that first, it covers pores on surface of ceramic object and second, it flattens surface of ceramic object after heating. One of properties of ceramic is its high resistance to freeze. It is also fireproof and is not deformed by fire.

Clean Pottery

Wipe off dust with a dry cloth. Use a clean, lint-free dusting cloth. Rub it gently and carefully along the surface of the object. Try a cotton cloth, or a fabric from nylon fibers made specifically for wiping away dust. Use suction. Place your object on a padded surface. Hold the nozzle of a vacuum about an inch away from the pottery. Apply suction as you brush the object’s surface with a soft paintbrush.

Warning

Do not use a dishwasher to clean valued ceramics. High temperatures water and aggressive detergents can permanently damage glazes and coloured enamel decoration. Avoid using household bleaches or proprietary cleaning products because they can cause irreversible damage. Cleaning liquid can penetrate the ceramic, taking dirt with it. This can cause new stains or make old stains worse.

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